Yin Yoga For Athletic Recovery

Yin Yoga For Athletic Recovery

If you’re not practicing yin yoga for athletic recovery, you’re leaving money on the table. Yin is one of the most effective types of yoga for increasing flexibility, relieving tightness and relaxing the body and mind. It’s not comfortable, and it requires a good amount of time, but the benefits far outweigh the price of entry.

HOW I STUMBLED ONTO YIN YOGA FOR ATHLETIC RECOVERY

When I first arrived in Bali, I spent 6 months teaching yoga at a surf camp. My students were surfing a minimum of 3 hours a day, and by the time they made it to my class, they were destroyed. Arms, shoulders, neck, lower back. They were in agony. And since most of them were there on a 2-week holiday from work, they didn’t want to miss a single day of swell due to muscle soreness.

Yin was the perfect style of practice for these guys because it involves deep stretching, you don’t have to support your bodyweight in the poses, it’s deeply relaxing and is great for beginners. It’s not a practice that anyone should do exclusively, but it’s the perfect complement to a rigorous athletic training program.

YIN AND YANG

Yin and yang is an ancient Taoist concept that explains the interdependency of oppositional forces. As an example, night relies on day for its existence, similarly, hot on cold, heaven on hell, and gravity on levity. Neither aspect is good or bad, but are more usefully understood as two sides of the same coin.

When applied to sports, yang activities are typically hot, fast, dynamic, stimulating, energetic and cardiovascular in nature. Whereas, yin activities are passive, cooling, relaxing and therapeutic. The evidence is clear that you don’t get to be a world class performer without committing to both intense training and smart recovery. Too much of one and not enough of the other will lead either to falling short or burning out.

WHAT IS YIN YOGA?

In yin yoga—unlike a yang style like Vinyasa Flow or Ashtanga—you hold poses for between 3-15 minutes. It shouldn’t be painful but it is uncomfortable for most people, and not just because of the intensity of the stretches. It can be boring, unless you choose to embrace the rare opportunity to rest fully—without reaching for your phone, flicking through Pink Bike or wetting your whistle.

The purist approach to yin is to focus on your breath and the sensations in your body—ie. meditate—but I’m not averse to you listening to a guided meditation, binaural beats, an audiobook, or thinking through a creative problem. The non-negotiables are that you are motionless, relaxed and unstimulated.

THE BENEFITS OF YIN YOGA FOR ATHLETIC RECOVERY

  • Increases flexibility.
  • Improves range of motion.
  • Eases aches and pains.
  • Improves posture.
  • Speeds up recovery.
  • Reduces injuries.
  • Increases breath efficiency.
  • Improves focus and concentration.
  • Reduces performance anxiety.
  • Builds discipline.
  • Relieves stress.
  • Calms the mind.
  • Promotes relaxation and restorative sleep.
  • Boosts creativity.

THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF YIN YOGA

  • You’ll need a timer, and some blocks, straps and cushions.
  • Prop yourself up with as much support as you need, to completely let go of tension in your muscles. Let gravity do the work.
  • Incrementally increase the hold times if your aim is to increase flexibility.
  • Breathe in and out through your nose—slowly and deep into your belly.
  • Be consistent. Commit to at least one hour a week.
  • If you fall asleep, that’s fine—you clearly needed the rest.
  • Back off from sensations of pain. Discomfort is par for the course.
  • Practice yin at the end of the day before bed, and never before exercise as it activates the parasympathetic “rest or digest” mode.

YOUR 10 YIN YOGA FOR ATHLETIC RECOVERY POSES

Hold them anywhere from 3-15 minutes on each side. Enjoy!

1. CHILD’S POSE

Yin For Athletic Recivery

  • Child’s pose stretches the upper back and shoulders, and calms the mind.
  • Bring your arms outside your knees and let go of all tension in your body.
  • If you can’t sit back comfortably on your heels, put a cushion or two between your butt and heels.
  • Breathe deeply into the front, back and sides of your ribcage.
2. PUPPY WITH HANDS IN REVERSE PRAYER

Modified Puppy Pose

  • Puppy pose decompresses the spine, and stretches the lats, shoulders, and triceps.
  • Bring your knees hip-width apart and point your toes straight back. Check that your hips are directly underneath your knees.
  • Pull your hips away from your elbows to feel the stretch in your triceps, shoulders and lats.
3. TWISTED SCORPION

Shoulder Opener

  • Twisted Scorpion stretches the chest and shoulders, and increases spinal mobility.
  • Lie on your stomach with your hands underneath your shoulders. Bring your right arm straight out to the side, palm facing down. Bend your left leg.
  • Press into your left hand and twist your body open, bringing your left foot flat to the mat behind you.
  • Support your head on a cushion if you feel any discomfort in your neck. Adjust the position of your straight arm, depending on where you need the stretch.
  • Breathe deep into your abdomen.
  • This pose should not be painful, so adjust yourself accordingly.
4. RECLINING HAND-TO-TOE

Modified Reclining Hand-To-Toe

  • Reclining Hand-To-Toe stretches the calves and hamstrings, without putting pressure on your lower back.
  • Increase the stretch by pushing through your heel.
  • If you find one hip hikes up, you can bend your bottom leg and bring the sole of your foot flat to the mat.
  • Use the weight of your arms to increase the intensity of the stretch.
5. SUPPORTED BRIDGE

Supported Bridge Pose

  • Supported Bridge relieves tension at the lower back, releases the hip flexors and stretches the abs, chest, shoulders and the back of the neck.
  • Make sure that your feet and knees are hip-width apart and that your toes point straight ahead.
  • Yoga blocks have 3 different heights, so only go as high as you’re ready for.
  • Breathe deep into your belly to release your psoas.
  • Supported Bridge is one of the most effective poses for relieving lower back pain, especially if you also suffer from tight hips.
6. DEAD PIGEON

Dead Pigeon

  • Dead Pigeon releases the lower back, and stretches the outer hips, glutes, groin, hamstrings, knees and ankles.
  • You can take hold of the back of your thigh or reach through and interlace your fingers around your shin to increase the intensity of the pose.
  • Try to maintain a neutral spine.
7. HAPPY BABY

Happy Baby

  • Happy Baby stretches the glutes, groin and hamstrings.
  • If you can’t reach your feet, you take hold of your ankles or shins.
  • Rock gently from side to side.
8. RECLINING BUTTERFLY

Reclining Butterfly

  • Reclining Butterfly opens up the hips, releases tension in the mid-back and gently stretches the chest and shoulders.
  • You can support your knees on cushions to completely let go of tension in your hips.
9. RECLINING SPINAL TWIST

Reclining Spinal Twist

  • Reclining Spinal Twist releases tension at the lower back and stretches the glutes, outer hips, lower back, abs, obliques, chest, and neck. It also increases spinal mobility.
  • Try to let go of tension in your neck and shoulders.
  • If your knee doesn’t come all the way down to the mat, you can support it on a cushion or two.
  • This is another great pose to alleviate lower back pain.
10. SLEEPING PIGEON

Sleeping Pigeon

  • Sleeping Pigeon is a deep hip opener that stretches the glutes and hip rotators on your bent leg and the hip flexors on your straight leg.
  • You can’t see it in this image, but the bottom part of your front leg should be positioned diagonally.
  • If your hips are not level, you can put a cushion or two under the hip of your bent leg.
  • Try to let go of any tension, thoughts or distractions.
FINAL RESTING POSE

Corpse Pose

  • Release your arms and legs and lie back in Final Resting Pose.
  • Notice how your body feels and allow the stretches to sink in for a 10-15 minutes before moving back into your evening. Try to follow the movement of breath in your body, as your belly and chest rise and fall.

GET INVOLVED

I’d love to crowdsource your favourite yin poses and hear about your experiences with yin yoga for athletic recovery. It’s not going to be for everyone, but for the most hard-charging of you, it’s got to be worth a shot.

Photo credit: Paul Baker

4 comments

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  • Thank you for sharing this articles. I had neck and shoulder pain for this 2 years.
    I’ll do these and I hope i’ll get better with these yoga poses.
    Thank you.

  • Thanks for this! It would be helpful to me to incorporate some quadracept/soaz stretching into a yin sequence. Oh, and also lats! Mine are pretty tight and could use some deep stretching. Do you have any suggestions for poses that work well for this? Thank you so much!